Park Pavilion

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The Park Pavilion is a building constructed by two load bearing spiralling concrete walls, each containing a small space within them. Large glass panels around the edge of the building makes the space usable throughout the year. The shape of the space inside the pavilion, with its curved walls and open perimeter, provides an atmosphere liberated from the weight of history in a context that is fully immersed in its own past. The design is a demonstration of how the shape of a wall and division of a space can have a strong impact on our mood and behaviour…

The Park Pavilion is a building constructed by two load bearing spiralling concrete walls, each containing a small space within them. Large glass panels around the edge of the building makes the space usable throughout the year. The shape of the space inside the pavilion, with its curved walls and open perimeter, provides an atmosphere liberated from the weight of history in a context that is fully immersed in its own past. The design is a demonstration of how the shape of a wall and division of a space can have a strong impact on our mood and behaviour.

The aim of the pavilion simple: to provide a space where people feel at home. A space which is warm, receptive and welcoming. It is of modest size compared to the other buildings on the estate, and functions as a much needed intimate space, as well as being equally suited to host events with numerous guests. The walls of the two cores are curved to enclose the necessary programmatic components; one contains a small bathroom, and the other a small kitchen. The cores are positioned in order to have the most structural efficiency, allowing the roof to span from each of the cores and cantilever all the way to the perimeter of the building, without any need for secondary support.

The site for the project is in a Grade II listed garden designed by Capability Brown, in direct proximity of a number of listed buildings, most prominently Brocklesby Hall. The concrete used in the core walls is pigmented to a shade similar to the traditional brick used in the surrounding buildings. As the concrete has the same colour throughout its thickness, any imperfections and scratches gives it a beautiful surface full of life. The roof and floor are both made out of polished concrete, which offers a sober and smooth surface in contrast to the more rustic cores.

  • Year: 2015 - 2020
  • Location: Lincolnshire, UK
  • Area: 160 sqm
Team
  • Martin Brandsdal
  • Magnus Casselbrant
  • Jesper Henriksson
Collaborators
  • Structural Engineer: ARUP
Timeline
  • 2015: Planning permission granted
  • 2016 - 2019: Design development
  • 2020: Construction